Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Nā Hulu Ali‘i | de Young Museum, San Francisco | August 29, 2015 – February 28, 2016

Explore the distinctive art, culture, and history of Hawai‘i with the first exhibition of Hawaiian featherwork on the U.S. mainland, developed in partnership with the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu. Presented in San Francisco, which is considered to be the gateway to the Pacific, the exhibition will feature approximately 75 rare and stunning examples of the finest featherwork capes and cloaks in existence, as well as royal staffs of feathers (kāhili), feather lei (lei hulu manu), helmets (mahiole), feathered god images (akua hulu manu), and related eighteenth- and nineteenth-century paintings and works on paper.

Handcrafted of plant fiber and rare feathers from endemic birds of the islands, the cloaks (‘ahu‘ula) and capes provided spiritual protection to Hawaiian chiefs, proclaiming their identity and status. The abstract patterns and compositions of royal feathers (nā hulu ali‘i) are both beautiful and full of cultural meaning. While the arrangements of their forms—crescents, triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, and lines—and fields of color appear contemporary, they are ancient. Symbols of the power and status of Hawai‘i’s monarchs at home and abroad, these vibrantly colored treasures of the Hawaiian people endure today as masterpieces of unparalleled artistry, technical skill, and cultural pride.

Dates + times
August 29, 2015 – February 28, 2016
de Young Museum, Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco
To learn more click here.

IMAGE: ‘Ahu ‘ula (cape), pre-1861. Yellow and black ‘ō ‘ō (Moho nobilis) feathers, red ‘i‘iwi (Vestiaria coccinea) feathers, and olonā (Touchardia latifolia) fiber. Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Ethnology Collection, 09670/1909.007. Photograph by Hal Lum and Masayo Suzuki